Texas: Plant Hardiness Zones, Climate & Soil Conditions

Our experienced writers spend hours deep researching, considering both scientific and experimental info to bring the insights you can trust.  

Agriculture is a vital part of the Texas economy.

Agriculture provides many different types of jobs in the state, including farmers, ranchers, and agricultural scientists.

Texas is one of the top producers of agriculture products in the United States. The state ranks first in cattle production, first in cotton production, third in hay production, and fourth in wheat production.

The Lone Star State also produces a variety of other crops, such as sorghum, peanuts, and pecans.

The climate in Texas is ideal for agriculture. The state has long growing seasons and ample rainfall.

These conditions allow farmers to grow a wide variety of crops.

Plant Hardiness Zone Map

Before moving to the climatic conditions of Texas, let us take a quick tour of the Plant Hardiness Zone Map.

Plant Hardiness Zone Map for Texas

The state of Texas belongs to zone 7b to 10a. Texas, being the 4th hottest state in the US with an annual temperature of 65.3˚F, has arid and semi-arid climates in the west and humid and sub-tropical climates in the east.

Precipitation

The average annual rainfall in Texas is about 26.04inches according to the 2020 US Climate Analysis.

April, May, and June are usually the rainiest while the parts near the coast are mostly cloudy throughout the year.

Soil type

The below map shows the soil distribution in the state.

Now, let us understand this map in detail with the help of a table.

Soil Order Of Texas

Soil / Sub SeriesLocationCharacteristics
Alfisols/Duval seriesNorthern and Western Rio Grande Plain on nearly level to gently sloping uplands1. have a subsurface of accumulation of clay
2. have greater than or equal to 35% base saturation
Aridisols/Uptan seriesTrans-Pecos region on nearly level to moderately sloping uplands1. dry soils of the desert
2. Have horizons with an accumulation of carbonates, gypsum, or sodium chloride
Entisols/Galveston seriesOccur on nearly level to strongly sloping coastal terraces, dunes, and offshore barrier islands along the Texas Gulf Coast1. These are soils with little evidence of soil formation
2. They lack a diagnostic horizon
Inceptisols/Weswood seriesAlong the flood plains of the Brazos and Colorado Rivers in central Texas1. Have weakly developed subsurface horizons
2. may be shallow to bedrock, occur on steeply sloping land, or they may be very deep soils in areas subject to intermittent flooding
Inceptisols/Weswood seriesAlong the flood plains of the Brazos and Colorado Rivers in central Texas1. Have weakly developed subsurface horizons
2. may be shallow to bedrock, occur on steeply sloping land, or they may be very deep soils in areas subject to intermittent flooding
Mollisols/Pullman seriesIn the High Plains on nearly level and very gently sloping uplands1. have a distinctive dark-colored surface horizon that is enriched with organic matter
2. They formed under grassland and are naturally fertile
Ultisols/Bowie seriesIn the East Texas Timberlands on broad, very gently sloping to moderately sloping uplands1. are highly weathered soils that have a subsurface horizon enriched with clay
2. have less than 35 percent base saturation
Vertisols/Houston Black seriesIn the Blackland Prairie in the central part of the state from Bonham south to San Antonio1. characterized by the presence of a mineral in the clay fraction called smectite
2. This mineral swells markedly when moist and shrinks when dry
Histosols/Allemands seriesIn southeast Texas in the coastal freshwater marshes. Histosols are not mapped extensively in Texas.1. composed almost entirely of organic matter in all stages of decomposition
Spodosols/Babco seriesIn the Flatwoods of southeast Texas. Spodosols are not mapped extensively in Texas.1. Acid soils with a subsurface accumulation of iron and organic matter.
2. generally form under forests